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INTRO LVL 1 LVL 2 LVL 3 LVL 4 LVL 5 LVL 6


!!! UNDER CONSTRUCTION !!
LEVEL ONE: Beginner
!!! UNDER CONSTRUCTION !!!


In level one's course, we'll be learning how to execute basic rhythm and groove, learn our 8 basic open chords, learn our first major scale and 5 pentatonic patterns, start some ear training, and learn a few songs!
Again, it is highly recommended that you touch on each category's first tier simultaneously. ie Rhythm 1-1, Groove 1-1, Chords 1-1, etc. rather than Rhythm 1-1, Rhythm 1-2, Rhythm 1-3, etc. It is also recommend that you spend roughly the same amount of time on each categories study, ie Rhythm 1-1 for 5 minutes, Groove 1-1 for 5 minutes,Chords 1-1 for 5 minutes, etc. Frequency is more important that quantity, even if that means you can only afford to spend 1 minute on each category. A 10 minute session twice a day is far better than a 10 hour session on one day a month.

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RHYTHM


RHYTHM 1-1: Quarter Notes
Understanding the quarter note is the foundation of all rhythm. It is the beat. As we practice the quarter note, we will also be simultaneously working on our alternate picking technique. If you play without a pick (fingerstyle), then adjust this to however you play (single finger for classical style. Index, middle and ring finger for flamenco style).
Set the metronome to a manageable tempo (the frequency of the pulse), for many that's around 80 beats per minute (B.P.M.). Select any note as long as it's surrounded by strings, we can select the note D on the 5th fret of the A string for example. It is very important to choose a string that's surrounded by strings in order to practice picking between strings.
With the metronome on, try to pick the string at the same time as the metronome makes a clicking sound. Pick downwards - matching the sound of the metronome's click, and pick upwards - also matching the sound of the metronome's click. As you do this try your very best to make the down and up sound even and as similar as possible to each other. If and when you're feeling comfortable, try looking away from your instrument and use your sense of touch to feel where the pick and strings are. The main purpose of this exercise is to get comfortable picking and learn to synchronize your rhythm to an external source (the metronome). Good luck!



***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT: alternate picking quarter notes, explanation and play along

RHYTHM 1-2: Eighth Notes
The next installment of rudimentary rhythm practice is the eighth note. As we did with the previous exercise (the quarter note), we will continue alternate picking along to the metronome at around 80 B.P.M. on a note that is surrounded by strings (D on the 5th fret of the A string for example). What we will be doing differently for this exercise is conditioning ourselves to change our subdivision by the "measure."
Do as we had done previously - alternate pick simultaneously with the metronome - but this time we will have to be mindful of a couple things. Upon starting the sequence, count (either out loud or in your head) the amount of metronome clicks while picking. After FOUR clicks have sounded (and you have picked four times along with it), you will then do two things. Begin counting the metronome anew for another count of four, AND pick twice as frequent during each metronome click. Essentially we are just doubling up what we had done. After four clicks (and subsequently eight pick strokes), you will return to the beginning of the sequence: counting the metronome for four clicks and picking once per click. Repeat. Always repeat.




***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT: alternate picking quarter notes and eighth notes, explanation and play along

RHYTHM 1-3: Sixteenth Notes
Now we are on to the final subdivision for level one, the sixteenth note. We will continue as before (alternate picking, metronome set to 80 B.P.M., a note surrounded by strings, etc.), but instead of returning to quarter notes after a measure of eighth notes we will instead move on to sixteenth notes.
As before, upon starting the sequence, count (either out loud or in your head) the amount of metronome clicks while picking. After four clicks have sounded (and you have picked four times along with it), begin counting the metronome anew for another count of four, pick twice as frequent during each metronome click. After four clicks have sounded (and you have picked eight times along with it), restart your count and pick four times by each metronome click. Essentially we are just doubling up yet again. Once you have completed this measure (and have picked sixteen times), return back to eighth notes (two picks per click, eight times per measure). Upon completing this measure you have completed the journey and are ready to renew the sequence. Repeat. Always repeat.




***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT: alternate picking quarter notes, eighth notes and sixteenth notes, explanation and play along. Some pro moves like open d if you wanna be one-handed.


GROOVE


GROOVE 1-1: Downbeat VS. Backbeat
Groove is a related study to rhythm, and so therefore it comes next. When studying groove it is important not to consciously count, you must prioritize feeling/hearing/automating the groove. For our introduction to groove we will be using a simple drumbeat. It is very important to work along with a drum set in order to naturalize the modern musician's sense of groove, so go ahead and download the .MP3 here: www.tyrannystudios.com/brga/ecourse/5mindrumbeat.mp3
While listening to the drum beat, pay very close attention to the two primary elements of the drums/pulse. The kick drum (the low booming thud felt more than it's heard), and the snare drum (the higher clapping sound that is heard more than it's felt). These are your two main elements to study for now. The kick drum embodyies the downbeat[citation needed] and the snare drum embodies the backbeat, think of these as synonyms of each other. The downbeat is considered the start and the stronger pulse of the two primary beats, and the backbeat consequently is the weaker of the two beats. If we began counting a measure along with the drums we would find that the downbeat/kick lands on counts 1 and 3, and the backbeat/snare lands on counts 2 and 4.
What we want to do to practice groove is play something (any given note, chord, string, etc.) simultaneously as either the kick drum (downbeat) OR the snare drum (backbeat). When playing to the downbeat, do your very best to play at the exact time as the kick drum. Really listen to yourself and the drum kit, and meditate on this. This isn't meant to be difficult, it is rather zen. After getting confident with playing to the downbeat, try doing the same thing but with the opposite element, the backbeat.
Once you are able to identify the downbeat and the backbeat and play along to it, the real practice comes from being able to pivot from one to the other "without skipping a beat" as the saying goes. So for example let's grab an A5 power chord, and play along to the downbeat (kick). Once you are playing confidently to the downbeat (kick), start thinking about transitioning to the backbeat (snare). First you need to listen for the backbeat, find it, imagine playing with it, all while maintaining your groove with the downbeat. Once you're ready, SWITCH and transition to playing only the backbeat (snare). Forget about playing along to the downbeat (kick) and concentrate on only playing to the backbeat (snare). Get your bearing, and when you're ready, see if you can reverse the steps and return to the downbeat (kick). Repeat. Always repeat.




***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT: talk about excalator, or snowboard gondala. "its coming up" "okay," "now!" *Switch*

GROOVE 1-2: Downbeat & Backbeat Exit
Are you able to switch "without skipping a beat?" If so, then now you're ready for the next challenge. This time we will begin by playing on every single beat, both the downbeat (kick) and backbeat (snare). When you're ready, try to transition from playing every single beat to make your exit either the downbeat (kick) or backbeat (snare) exclusively. The idea is that we're whipping up the chaos and looking to see if we can cleanly execute either the downbeat exclusively or backbeat exclusively without stumbling or getting lost. Seems easy enough right?




***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT: it's easy to get sucked into playing every beat, be careful!

GROOVE BONUS: Dance
I pride myself in teaching a useful, practical, stripped down, and highly modified version of traditional "Western Music Theory" as it applies to the modern guitar player today and borrow HEAVILY from other music theories from different cultures. In some other music traditions (non-Northern European), dance is not separate from musical consumption and performance, but interrelated. When it comes to groove, get your body involved! Take a page out of the book of west African musicians who typically do not think of dance (aka body movement) as being separate from rhythm, but integral. Get your body involved when you're practicing your groove and see if it helps you.


CHORDS


CHORDS 1-1: Open Em & D
There are eight basic open chords, and we will learn them all in level one. Let's start with Em [minor] and D [major]. There are literally thousands of resources on how to play these chords so if my pictures, videos, and short instructions do not work, take to the internet!
To play an Em place your index finger on the 2nd fret of the A-string, and place your middle finger on the 2nd fret of the D-string. You will find that both fingers are side by side. Give all six strings a strum and boom, you have Em.
To play D place your index finger on the 2nd fret of the G-string, ring finger on the 3rd fret of the B-string, and middle finger on the 2nd fret of the [high] e-string. Give the first four strings a strum (omitting the low E-string and A-string) and boom, you have D.
Go back and forth from Em and D a few times for practice. Repeat. Always repeat.



CHORDS 1-2: Open G and Home Chord Exercise
After learning Em and D, now we're ready for another chord which is G [major]. Pretty straight forward, place your middle finger on the 3rd fret of the low E-string, index finger on the 2nd fret of the A-string, and ring finger on the third fret of the high e-string. Strum all 6 strings and boom, you have G.
Now that we have three chords to interplay with, I'd like to introduce a simple and effective way of memorizing newer chords all while reinforcing older chords, It's called the home chord vocabulary drill! Basically what you do is go to and from every single chord that you know of from your newest chord. So for example, G will be our "new chord" and Em and D will be our catalog of chords. What we'll do is begin by playing G, then we'll play Em, and then we'll return "home" to G. Then play the next chord that we know which is D, and then return to G. 1 lap completed of the home chord exercise. As you learn more chords, replace the home chord (G in this example) with your newest chord, and place G among the other chords in your total repertoire of chords. Repeat. Always repeat.




***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT: GUITAR VOCABULARY DRILL WITH G EM AND D.

CHORDS 1-3: Open C
After G comes C [major], arguably the most difficult of all the open chords. Sorry! To play C, start with your ring finger on the 3rd fret of the A-string, then your middle finger on the D-string and your index finger on the 1st fret of the B-string. When you strum, avoid the low E-string (as it is not part of the chord) and strum the remaining 5 strings. Remember that home chord exercise from before? Try it out now with C as the home.


CHORDS 1-4: Open Am
Am [minor] is a 5 stringed chord. Like C, we will be avoiding the low E-string. Take your middle finger and place it on the 2nd fret of the D-string, take your ring finger and place it on the 2nd fret of the G-string, and lastly place your ring finger on the 1st fret of the B-string. Strum all the strings except for the low E-string and you have Am. Notice that there is only a one finger difference between Am and C. Now would be a good time to implement that home chord exercise but with C as the repeated chord.



CHORDS 1-5: Open Dm
Dm [minor] is probably the least used out of the 8 basic chords, so it's not the end of the world if you frequently forget this chord in the future, or if you've already been playing guitar for a while and somehow never learned it.
To play Dm, place your middle finger on the 2nd fret of the G-string, ring finger on the 3rd fret of the B-string, and the index finger on the 1st fret of the e-string. Dm is a 4 string├ęd chord like D, so avoid the low E-string and A-string when playing this chord. Now that we've learned Dm, let's make it our home chord in our home chord exercise!
At this point we now have the comparative chords Dm and D. Take note on how although it is a one fret difference, it is violently different in the hand.


CHORDS 1-6: Open E & A
Double header here with E [major] and A [major]. E is a breeze if you already know Am. Take Am (which you know already right?) and just move it up a set of strings; middle finger on the 2nd fret of the A-string, ring finger on the 2nd fret of the D-string, and index finger on the 1st fret of the G-string. Hit all 6 strings and you have E. While we're at it, compare the difference between E and Em. There is only a one fret/note difference but the tonality has shifted a bit. Something to take note of.
When it comes to the chord A, all you have to do is place your index finger on the 2nd fret of the D-string, middle finger on the 2nd fret of the G-string, and the ring finger on the 2nd and fret of the B-string. Avoid the low E-string as this is a 5 string├ęd chord and bam, you got A. As with Dm versus D, and Em versus E, take notice on the one note difference between A and Am.



CHORDS 1-7: Chord Vocabulary Drill with All Basic Open Chords
You didn't forget about the home chord vocabulary exercise right?



***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT


SCALES


SCALES 1-1: Walking Exercise
A healthy part of any aspiring guitarists practice regime at one point another is the walking exercise. Almost every guitar player has their own variant on it, but the principle is always the same. Work each finger, and assign each finger to a fret. As the name implies, walk your fingers, one-by-one, through the each fret and progressively through each string until you run out of strings and fingers. Once you've reached the end, just retrace your steps and go back the way you came.
*Over the years I've decided that staying at the first couple frets is best as to train the fingers to stretch. Once your fingers are able to stretch, consider moving the walking exercise to different areas of the neck.


SCALES BONUS: Walking Exercise Variants
Make up your own versions of the walking exercise. Zig-zag, go diagonal, alternate your sequence, etc. This exercise doesn't have a "correct" way of proceduing, the only rule is to ensure that your index finger plays along on the 1st fret, your middle finger plays along the 2nd fret, your ring finger plays the 3rd fret, and your pinky plays along the 4th fret. Get creative!


***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT. Diagonal, zig zag, alternating, combo, etc.

SCALES 1-2: My First Major Scale part 1
"Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, Ti, Do~" just on guitar. As before, be sure to assign the correct fingers to their corresponding frets. We will be moving our hand up an entire fret for this sequence though, so the index finger will be on the 2nd fret, middle finger on the 3rd fret, and ring finger on the 4th fret and the pinky is assigned to the 4th fret. The difference between executing the major scale versus the chromatic walking exercise is that we will be omitting some notes along the way.
It will be played as follows: middle finger on the 3rd fret of the low E-string, pinky on the 5th fret of the same string (the low E-string). Notice that we SKIPPED our ring finger and we completely ignored the index finger for this string. We've run out of fingers so no we're moving onto the A-string. Index finger on the 2nd fret of the A-string, followed by the middle finger on the 3rd fret of the same string (A-string), and lastly the pinky on the 5th fret of the same string (A-string). We've run out of fingers yet again so now we'll move onto the D-string and play the 2nd fret with our index finger, followed by our ring finger on the 4th fret of the same string (D-string) and to finish it all off we'll play the 5th fret with our pinky on the same string (D-string). Do that a few times and when you're ready, see if you can climb the pattern and then reverse the pattern and come back the way you came. Repeat. Always repeat.


SCALES 1-3: My First Major Scale part 2
Now we're going to add the next octave on top of what we already know. The same rules apply, each finger is assigned to their corresponding fret. To play the second octave, we will begin at the ending point of the first octave (the last note that we played in part 1). Play the 5th fret of the D-string with your pinky finger, then move onto the G-string and play the 2nd fret with your index finger, ring finger on the 4th fret and then use your pinky finger to play the 5th fret. As before, we've run out of fingers so now move onto the next string which is the B-string and begin by playing on the 3rd fret with your middle finger, followed by the 5th fret with your pinky finger. Running out of fingers again, we move to the last string - the high e-string - and play the 2nd fret with our index and the 3rd fret with our middle to end the sequence. Try that a few times, and when you're feeling confident, try the sequence in reverse. The final test would be to try both octaves forwards and backwards. Repeat. Always repeat.


SCALES 1-4: My First Major Scale part 3
At this point we're running awfully low on strings to ascend through. From here on out, we're moving horizontally. If you haven't noticed by now, intervals 3 & 4 and 7 & 8 are adjacent. Did you notice that? If not, go back and play your previous two octaves of scales and count as you do them. You will find that 3 & 4 and 7 & 8 are side by side! To keep things real simple, this is always true. Do do the third octave from where we're at, blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah


SCALES 1-5: Pentatonic Pattern 5
Pentatonic means "5 tones." In the big scope of things, the pentatonic is exactly as the name implies, 5 tones per octave and as a result there are actually many different pentatonic scales (ie Egpytian, Hirajoshi, etc.) we'll be learning what's colloquially known as THE Pentatonic Scale. What does it means for the aspiring guitarist? Two notes per string which makes it real easy to access and play. We'll be starting with pattern number 5 as it is the easiest one to remember visually. This scale pattern, and all future pentatonic scale patterns are comprised of either narrow increments (2 frets) or wide increments (3 frets). BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH


SCALES 1-6: Pentatonic Pattern 1
# of pattern 5 is pattern 1! I teach with the purpose of ease/practicality in mind, unfortunately the "first pattern" you're learning is pattern 5, and the "second pattern" you will learn, is pattern 1. Sorry in advance, you'll thank me later. Sharing shit with pattern 5. etc. etc. If you're on an acoustic or classical guitar this will be harder to play due to not having access to these frets, you should still practice them anyway. BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH


SCALES 1-7: Pentatonic Pattern 4
Pattern 4 lies to the left (flat / lower) of Pattern 5. The numbering convention will start to make more sense from here on out. BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH


SCALES 1-8: Pentatonic Pattern 3
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SCALES 1-9: Pentatonic Pattern 2
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SCALES 1-10: All Pentatonics, & Fluency Practice Concepts etc.
different concepts for reinforcing the pentatonic scales. forwards backwards, up down, etc. play without looking. etc. blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah blah



***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT

SCALES BONUS: Position versus Pattern
For many years (like many self-taught guitarists) I confused the the terms position and pattern and used them iinterchangeably wrongfully, so I'm here to set the record straight! A position uses a pattern (1, 2, 3, 4, or 5), but a pattern is not a position. A position is basically the area of the neck you play at, in a particular key, and as such is labeled by whichever fret your index finger is anchored on. This means that there are essentially as many positions as there are frets (positions 0-20+).
For example, we've been learning everything in the key of G, so, let's say we wanted to play in position 9. We would place our index finger on the 9th fret, and try to figure out what pattern (of the 5 patterns) that we're in in the key of G. Being in position 9 in the key of G you should realize that you are in the vicinity of where pattern 5 lies. I know... it's unnecessarily hard, but this inherited from the classical world where you'd be reading sheet music and strategically selecting what position to play in.
Because of all this, you will typically find that when guitar players communicate to each other, they usually say, "this position" and just quickly demonstrate the scale on the guitar, rather than getting gummed up by labeling the position. Guitarists naming/labeling conventions can vary from player to player so it's most effective to show and have the various guitarists translate it to themselves.



***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT


AURAL


AURAL 1-1: 5th versus 8th
Step one. Let's listen to the difference between two pitches. BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH BLAH
I also highly recommend using the website MusicTheory.net 's ear trainer https://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-interval and set the parameter to Perfect 5th and Octave. Try to get an accuracy of 90%



***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT

AURAL 1-2: Major Triad versus Minor Triad
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I also highly recommend using the website MusicTheory.net 's ear trainer https://www.musictheory.net/exercises/ear-chord and set the parameter to Major Triad and Minor Triad. Try to get an accuracy of 90%



***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT

AURAL 1-3: The [Perfect] 5th A.K.A. The Power Chord
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AURAL 1-3: The 8th (Octave)
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AURAL 1-4: The Ear Game
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***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT

AURAL 1-5: The [Major] 3rd
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***YOUTUBE TRAINING VIDEO WITH THESE INTERVALS

AURAL 1-6: The [Perfect] 4th
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***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT

***YOUTUBE TRAINING VIDEO WITH THESE INTERVALS

AURAL 1-7: The Major 7th
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***YOUTUBE TRAINING VIDEO WITH THESE INTERVALS

AURAL 1-8: The [Major] 6th
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***YOUTUBE TRAINING VIDEO WITH THESE INTERVALS

AURAL 1-9: The [Major] 2nd
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***short! YOUTUBE VIDEO(S) EXPLAINING ABOVE CONCEPT

***YOUTUBE TRAINING VIDEO WITH THESE INTERVALS


THEORY


THEORY 1-1: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 1 - Can You Cleanly Play The Chords?
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THEORY 1-2: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 2 - Can You Cleanly Play The Chords with Loose Counting?
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THEORY 1-3: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 3 - Can You Cleanly Play The Chords with Hard Counting?
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THEORY 1-4: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 4 - Can You Cleanly Play The Chords while Playing Along to the Song?
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THEORY 1-5: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 5 - Can You Play Right Hand Rhythm Pattern?
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THEORY 1-6: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 6 - Can You Play Some of Right Hand Rhythm Pattern While Playing the Chords?
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THEORY 1-7: Seven Steps to Playing a Song, Step 7 - Can You Play The Part Note-For-Note?
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UTILITY


UTILITY 1-1: Dot Inlay part 1, E-String G A B
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UTILITY 1-2: Dot Inlay part 2, A-String C D E
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UTILITY 1-3: Dot Inlay part 3, #'s & b's
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UTILITY 1-4: Dot Inlay part 4, F & B
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UTILITY 1-5: E-String's C D E
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OTHER


OTHER 1-1: Names of the Strings
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OTHER 1-2: How To Tune
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OTHER 1-3: How To Use Tablature
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OTHER 1-4: The Finger Gym
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*note that this is not my video! But this is where I adopted the exercise.

OTHER 1-5: Finding The Key
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OTHER 1-6: Finding The Tempo
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OTHER 1-7: Strumming/Picking Metronome Pressure
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SONGS


SONGS 1-1: D Songs - Row Row Row Your Boat
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SONGS 1-2: D & Em Song - Horse With No Name
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SONGS 1-3: G, C, D Songs - Kockin' On Heaven's Door, Leaving on a Jet Plane
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SONGS 1-4: G, C, D, Em Song - Hey Ya!
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SONGS 1-5: Dm, G, C Song - Sunday Morning
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SONGS 1-6: A, D, E, Song - Stir It Up
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LEVEL ONE TEST


LEVEL ONE TEST
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CONTINUE ON TO LEVEL 2


If you notice any layout errors, link malfunctions, etc. please inform me via email at BRGuitarAcademy@gmail.com.

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